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Design

New Hospitality Design Trends 2020

The overriding theme of 2020 hospitality design trends is that of being in the present – with an eye on the future. Read on for details of new hospitality trends in 2020, and ideas on how to implement them in your own designs.

 

Warm Welcomes

 

Many new décor ideas are centered around creating warm, welcoming, comfortable spaces. This has been in the works for a while, and Authentic Interior reported on it last year. Their article, Interior Design Trends For 2020 From Milan Design Week 2019, explained:

 

“Today we are tired of touchscreens, unwelcoming light in the public spaces and offices. That’s why we are seeking refuge, a cozy, warm space where we can feel well. It applies not only to homes, but it also applies to commercial places as well.

 

Choosing good commercial interior design is crucial for clients’ wellbeing and of course, marketing. Interior design trends in 2020 will center around wellbeing, comfort, and sustainability.”

 

Design Scene echoed this sentiment in their article, Restaurant Interior Design Trends 2020:

 

Restaurateurs, nowadays, try to give their place a cozy, residential feeling by decorating it with plants. They put special effort into their arrangement.”

 

This ties in with the new “Grandmillennial” design trend. House Beautiful coined the phrase in their article, The Rise of ‘Grandmillennial’ Style:

 

“Ranging in age from mid-20s to late-30s, grandmillennials have an affinity for design trends considered by mainstream culture to be “stuffy” or “outdated”—Laura Ashley prints, ruffles, embroidered linens. Unlike that of the late-aughts hipster, their taste for the antiquated isn’t ironic; it’s less twee than timeless.”

 

“But maybe the ultimate appeal of the grandmillennial aesthetic lies in the fact that, for the stressed out twenty- and thirty-somethings of the world, that cozy chintz chair at your grandmother’s house represents a much-needed respite.”

 

Another can’t miss element of Grandmillennial style? Color! Subtle is out, and saturation is in.

 

Jewel Tones

 

The introduction of vivid jewel tones and deep, rich colors will distinguish this decade from the last.

 

Pantone has named “Classic Blue” as the hue for 2020, and the deep shade pairs perfectly with shades of ruby, emerald, topaz, and amethyst.

 

Jewel tones can make a space feel lush, luxurious, and inviting.

 

The Realtor.com article, Bring the Bold! The 5 Biggest Winter Design Trends Dare to Brighten Things Up, discusses the resurgence of jewel tones:

 

“Emerald green and jewel tones in general are part of a 2020 trend we’re calling ‘Old World Minimalism,’” says Rebecca Breslin, design manager for Wayfair Professional.”

 

Elle Décor also got some expert advice on trending jewel tones – this time from Sue Wadden of Sherwin-Williams. In The Colors You’re Going to See Everywhere in 2020, Wadden says,

 

“2020 is the start of a new decade, and in true ‘Roaring 20s’ fashion, we’ll start seeing a trend toward bolder, deeper colors, accented with a touch of opulence.”

 

Architecture Ideas echoed this statement in their article, Interior Design Trends: What to Expect in 2020:

 

“According to some designers, neutral colors will be replaced by warm colors, jewel tones, and saturated hues. Walls, cabinets, furniture, and tiles are the perfect opportunity to bring in color.”

 

 

Urban Jungles

 

Another play on these lush jewel tones are a unique concept: urban jungles. They’re predicted to be big in 2020, especially for restaurants.

 

Per Design Scene:

 

“There is some aesthetic value that is associated with greens. And also, plants look great in pictures, and that is the reason why such ‘urban jungles’ are extremely popular among the Instagrammers.”

 

What distinguishes urban, edgy jungles from the green décor we’re used to seeing? The New Décor Trends article, What Will Be The Restaurants in 2020, says the difference is rich backgrounds and memorable displays:

 

“The next clearly visible trend is a dark interior with unusual landscaping. Plants in the interior have long been commonplace, but here we are talking about incredible solutions: huge trees, ferns, green compositions (even designs) combined with a black or dark gray background and light accents on the green.”

 

This trend correlates with a newfound appreciation for vertical, hanging, and draped greenery. 

 

Cannabis Tourism

 

Speaking of plants…cannabis tourism is rapidly increasing in popularity! Hotel Tech Report reviewed the 100+ Hotel Trends to Watch in 2020, and cannabis tourism was one of them:

 

“As marijuana laws loosen, a new segment of travelers are “going green” in a way that has nothing to do with the environment: traveling to a city specifically to explore the recreational drug.”

 

Some hotels and restaurants have relaxed their rules about smoking marijuana on the premises; others have fully embraced the trend as an immersive experience. MetroUK’s list, The 11 Big Travel Trends of 2020, predicted:

 

“2020 will see the rise of the “Cannabis Tourist” – with hotels increasingly offering everything from weed smoking yoga sessions, luxury CBD oil massages, marijuana fine-dining, pot cooking classes and marijuana laced desserts on the menu.”

 

House Beautiful showcased some very specific examples in their article, These Are the Trends to Watch in 2020, According to Our Next Wave Designers:

 

“(Jean) Liu also points to an uptick in cannabis-inspired rooms in the wake of expanding marijuana legalization. “From the wellness room by Iris Danker at this year’s Hamptons Holiday House to Flavor Paper’s scratch ‘n sniff ‘Cannabliss’ wallpaper, we expect these plants to be making their way into homes across the country,” she says.”

 

Wallpaper is also trending for 2020, but there’s a décor option that’s even more popular: murals!

 

Wall Murals

 

The newest way to make your space Instagrammable is actually one of the oldest forms of art – wall murals and oversized paintings. Phase Zero Design wrote an article about this, called Just a “Taste” of Design Trends Taking Over the Restaurant Industry in 2020. They noted that “big visuals and design elements” are what to try this year:

 

Believe it or not, that ‘cool mural’ is memorable and enough to make a guest come back again and again. Aside from your menu, your restaurant’s atmosphere is the only thing that differentiates you from the restaurant two blocks down.

 

By implementing strategic and memorable design features, you create a “photo-ready” space that will lead to a strong social media presence and bring customers into your restaurant to experience it for themselves.”

 

Lux Deco expressed the same sentiments in their post, Interior Design Trends for 2020:

 

“Emerging as one of 2020’s interior design trends to take note of are wall murals. These can be interpreted in many ways, from panels of paintings that dominate a single wall to mural wallpaper that wraps around the entire room in a maximalist way.”

 

Maximalism

 

All of the aforementioned trends fit under one big umbrella: maximalism. Curbed wrote an article, Inside the Powerfully Expressive World of Maximalism, that sums it up well:

 

“But maximalism is so much more. And right now, it’s everywhere in design: It’s the ‘grandmillennial’ interiors swathed in lace and chintz, the immersive Instagram museums and Infinity Rooms clogging your feed, the plant-filled Jungalows, the Memphis-inspired patterns and murals taking over building facades.

 

It’s the restaurant decked out in an explosion of fringe, drapes, leather, velvet, and marble. Maximalism embraces decoration, pattern, color—all sorts of things that are vibrant, fun, expressive, and pleasurable.”

 

After all this focus on what’s in for 2020, you may be wondering what’s out. Our research shows these 5 trends dying down in the new decade:

 

      • Millennial Pink
      • Rose Gold
      • Blonde Wood
      • Chevrons
      • Minimalism

 

Did you catch our article on what long-lasting hospitality design trends are still in this year? Check it out and get inspired to redefine, redesign, or redecorate your space!

“Mahalo” green wall welcome sign at California Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, NV
Faux trees, plants, and flowers at Vanderpump Cocktail Garden at Cesars Palace Las Vegas Hotel & Casino, NV
Instagrammable Place: Restoration Hardware West Palm Beach
Fabricated Mediterannean Olive Trees at RH (Restoration Hardware) Rooftop Restaurant in West Palm Beach, FL
Flower wall tunnel at CATCH Aria Las Vegas
Faux floral wall entrance to CATCH Restaurant at ARIA Resort & Casino in Las Vegas, NV
Replica Traveler’s Palms at The Kindler Hotel in Lincoln, NE
Replica ivy and palm plants at Bobby Flay’s Shark Restaurant at the Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas, NV
Dispensary design decor
Green wall logo mural with faux plants at Grass Monkey Cannabis Company Dispensary in South Portland, ME
Wall mural and replica trees at Queensyard Restaurant at Hudson Yards in New York, NY
Faux cherry blossom tree and mural painting at Okura Robata Grill & Sushi Bar in La Quinta, CA
Preserved boxwood hedges and fabricated London Plane trees at RH (Restoration Hardware) Rooftop Restaurant in New York, NY

Hospitality Design Trends 2020 – What’s Staying In Style

Hospitality design trends are constantly changing, but there are always some favorites that stick around season after season.

 

2020 is no exception – the new decade has inspired some exciting new hospitality design trends for hotels, restaurants, and bars. This article on 2020 décor and design trends will bring you up to speed on what’s staying in season. Once you’re updated on what should stay, check out our follow up article on new trends in hospitalty design for the new decade! 

 

Going Green

“Green” is the key word this year. Recycled, reused, and responsibly sourced materials are quickly becoming the norm, along with designs that harmonize with nature. Hotel Tech Report named “LEED Certification” as one of 100+ Hotel Trends to Watch in 2020:

 

“Short for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, this global certification (LEED) measures the eco-friendliness of a building.”

 

TreeScapes’ preserved palm fronds and palm tree bark encased tree trunks are made with recycled plant material. They are so resource-efficient that they qualify for up to 90% of their purchase price in LEED credits!

 

Lodging Magazine’s article, Eight Ways to Foster Wellness and Interconnectedness Through Hotel Design, mentioned how going green is also inspiring color choices:

 

“The urge to reconnect with nature in today’s society is also affecting color selection. Nature-themed colors are in.”

 

Biophilic Design

The other side of the green trend is something that’s been going on for a while and may continue through the entire decade: biophilic design. It’s often described as bringing the outside inside, or In and Out design. Research has found that humans are happier, healthier, and more productive when nature is brought indoors.

 

Noted interior designer Cristina Villalon discussed this in her Smart Meetings article Hotel Trends from a Celebrity Designer:

 

“Biophilic design connects a visitor with nature. As many people spend most of their time indoors, they crave moments of interaction with nature. Biophilic design provides a way to meet those needs by creating a habitat in our built environments.”

 

It’s not just about aesthetic appeal and stress relief, though. Biophilic design makes financial sense! Terrapin Bright Green released The Economics of Biophilia, a white paper that detailed how the presence of plants and trees can increase profits:

 

“When shown images of greener retail settings, respondents indicated that an acceptable price to pay was 20% higher for an item in convenient shopping (e.g., a sandwich for lunch), 25% higher for general shopping (e.g., a new jacket or watch), and 15% more for specialty shopping (e.g., a gift for a family member) (55. Wolf, 2005 ).

 

The addition of plant life into the realm of retail shopping appears to act as a stimulus that boosts the image perception and economic viability of stores.

 

If you’re interested in learning more about these hospitality design trends, check out our free Basics of Biophilic Design white paper.

 

Indoor Trees

This trend started in the twenty-teens, and we’re proud that we played a role in increasing the popularity of indoor trees as hospitality décor. Our replica Mediterranean Olive Trees at the RH (formerly known as Restoration Hardware) 3 Arts Club Café helped to spearhead this trend.

 

We’ve also created and installed indoor Cherry Blossom, Birch, Acacia, Palm, and Oak trees at restaurants around the world!

 

The Eater included indoor trees in their article The Stunning Restaurant Design Trends Most Likely to Take Over 2020:

 

“In 2020, I’m expecting to see folks push the envelope with their hanging gardens, indoor trees, and wall-to-wall leaves and show us something we haven’t seen yet.”

 

In another article, Forget Your Fiddle-Leaf Figs: 2020 Restaurant Decor Is All About the Booth Tree, suggests that “trees growing out of the backs of booths are among the lushest restaurant design trends.

 

Social Media Appeal

Instagram walls and photo-friendly spaces will continue to grow in popularity this decade. Our customized green walls, flower walls, and vertical gardens make ideal selfie spots for your guests! Parterre Flooring mentions this in their article, 10 Restaurant Design Trends to Watch in 2020:

 

Social media also allows users to experience a restaurant before they even step inside the door. They can look at pictures of the restaurant’s design aesthetic, and of the food (either from the restaurant’s own social media account or from others who have posted content and tagged the location).”

 

Tips from the article How Technology Can Help Restaurants to Serve Millennial & Gen Z Better include offering free wifi, online booking, and even using AV/VR to entice diners.

 

ProGroup Contracting had similar advice in their article 2020 Hotel Design Trends to Keep at The Cutting Edge and Remain Competitive:

 

Being that Instagram is one of the most effective marketing tools for building brand awareness, hotels need to create spaces that are Instagram-worthy. This means using quirky and playful designs to create unique spaces to become Instagrammable.”

 

Giving your space social media appeal is easier than it sounds! Our free infographic and white paper, How to Make the Next Instagrammable Space, offers inspiration, ideas for hospitality design trends, real world success stories, and a easy to implement tips.

 

Faux Plants

Designing with plants fits right in with the trends of going green and using biophilic design. The twist for 2020, though, is that artificial plants are taking center stage! Part of this was spurred by another recent and unfortunate trend: dead plants on display.

 

The Eater summed up the problem in their 2018 article, We Need to Talk About Dead Houseplants in Restaurants:

 

“Dining room greenery is perfect for Instagram, but only if the plants are alive.”

 

Artificial plants are big in home design, and that has carried over to the hospitality industry. Forbes offered insight in the article Americans Will Shop High-Low For Home Furnishings, And 5 Other Decorating Trends In 2020:

 

“Artificial plants always look perfect and have that feel of foliage.”

 

Wondering what’s brand new for 2020? Be sure to read our follow up article, New Hospitality Design Trends 2020!

Fully Organic Preserved Palm Trees by International TreeScapes
Preserved Palm Trees at Margaritaville in Las Vegas, NV
Artificial plants at Bobby Flay’s Shark Restaurant at the Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas, NV
Faux bougainvillea at Shaquille’s Restaurant in Los Angeles, CA
Replica Acacia tree at Queensyard Restaurant at Hudson Yards in New York, NY
Custom fabricated tree at Sushisamba Restaurant in London, England
Faux floral wall at CATCH restaurant at ARIA Resort & Casino in Las Vegas, NV
Artificial green walls at IPIC theater in Delray Beach, FL
Instagrammable Place: Vanderpump Cocktail Garden Flowers Greenery
Artificial plant wall at Vanderpump Cocktail Garden at Cesars Palace Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, NV

Real vs. Artificial Trees – Regulations & Laws

Dispensary design decor
Fabricated Golden Bamboo by International TreeScapes

The third topic in our series of articles on real vs. artificial trees is regulation. This includes local, statewide, and federal laws, as well as zoning restrictions, building limitations, and other unique circumstances.

 

It would be great if trees and plants could be planted anywhere, anytime, and by anyone. Unfortunately, this is not the case. You may want a beautiful towering oak for your front yard, but local ordinances may prohibit this. Luckily, faux indoor options are usually acceptable. Artificial trees can meet regulations that living trees may not pass.

 

Real trees and plants can obstruct views, require too much water, or (most commonly) have roots that could grow to disrupt buildings, sidewalks, and roads.

 

This is true on a larger scale for businesses or cities that want to integrate living trees and plants into their design. Artificial trees avoid this concern, because they don’t ever grow larger, and they have no roots to interfere with infrastructure. Plus, artificial trees tend to survive longer in the city than real living trees.

 

Smaller artificial trees and plants can also be placed in areas that wouldn’t be able to support the weight of a growing tree. This is why faux options tend to be preferred for balconies, rooftops, and indoor locations.

 

There’s a new business emerging with a unique set of restrictions: cannabis. Many dispensaries want to decorate with cannabis plants but aren’t allowed to. Each state in America has different restrictions for selling, growing, and consuming marijuana products.

 

A cannabis dispensary might want marijuana plants strictly for aesthetic appeal, for example. The problem here is that a healthy plant could technically produce a large quantity of cannabis that could be cultivated and sold.

 

Dispensaries already struggle with federal restrictions, conflicting laws, and different permit requirements depending on location. Rather than risk their business licenses by growing on site, they can simply utilize fake cannabis plants for effect.

 

Another common scenario where this plays out is in Homeowner’s Associations (HOAs) across America. If your neighborhood is part of an HOA, there are likely strict guidelines on what you can and can’t plant. You can often avoid challenges by using faux trees and plants instead.

 

It is important to note, though, that HOAs often heavily regulate exterior decor and landscape features as well. Generally speaking, if you want a big cherry blossom or ficus tree on your property, you might want to opt for a fabricated tree instead.

 

The same can be said for those who wish to display regulated, non-native, or invasive plants and trees. Kudzu, golden bamboo, Canada thistles, wild chervils, and many other plants are prohibited state or nationwide. If you want to decorate with any of these prohibited or restricted breeds, you likely need to go with a faux option instead.

 

Trees like the sycamore maple and cutleaf birch are banned from public planting in many states, because they choke out local vegitation, block too much sun, or colonize open spaces too quickly. Artificial versions of those trees, and many more, meet strict restrictions like these.

 

TreeScapes & PlantWorks are commited to helping the environment, one tree at a time. That’s why we will donate to have at least one tree planted for every fabricated, replica, or preserved tree we sell!

 

We’ve partnered with the charitable organization One Tree Planted to do our part for the planet. Visit their website to see how you can help with their reforestation efforts too.